Twitter, Magna, IPG Media Lab to Video Advertisers: Mix It Up

A new study showed that use of multiple formats was more effective than sticking with a single format

The test was conducted across six industry verticals and 136 different ad scenarios.

Should advertisers with fixed budgets spend more money on a single ad format, or should they spread their budgets across multiple formats? Twitter teamed up with Magna and IPG Media Lab on a study to answer that very question.

The social network and the two IPG Mediabrands units said the results of “Mixing It Up: Diversifying Ad Formats to Achieve More” demonstrated that the use of multiple formats in digital advertising can help brands better tell their stories and boost awareness, brand favorability, research intent and purchase intent.

Research was done in two parts: An eye-tracking analysis with 69 Twitter users who visited Magna’s lab in San Francisco and donned eye-tracking glasses, and an ad-effectiveness analysis with some 4,000 Twitter users participating on mobile devices across three ad types: preroll (dubbed Amplify on Twitter), traditional promoted video and First View (a one-day takeover of the standalone video ad atop the feed).

The test was conducted across six industry verticals and 136 different ad scenarios, and key findings included:

  • A mix for better storytelling: The three companies said seeing an ad in a variety of visually different contexts makes it stand out more, leading to six times the impact on research intent, doubling the impact on purchase intent, boosting ad recall by 58% (versus 46% for ads in a single format) and seeing 61% of participants say the ad stood out among other tweets (compared with 51%).

  • First impressions count: The first exposure should be the one that grabs the most attention, and Twitter’s First View format proved to be 27% more cost-efficient at impacting purchase intents than when other formats were used first.

  • Leverage unique strengths: First View generated mass attention, while preroll and promoted video used together drive new consumers and past buyers through the purchasing journey. The three companies said preroll leads to 8% jumps in new product awareness and research intent, while past buyers are 14% more likely to complete promoted videos. The latter also boosts awareness of cultural connections by 18% and lifts positive brand perceptions by 9%.

Twitter head of global business partners Stephanie Prager said in a statement, “When you’re building a campaign, you’re trying to tell the best, most impactful and most accessible story possible. Our research validates that at its best, storytelling isn’t just about the message: It’s also about the method. We hope this encourages advertisers to continue exploring and experimenting with the different surfaces and formats for their messages that live within digital platforms like Twitter.”

Magna senior vice president of intelligence solutions Kara Manatt added, “For a long time, many brands thought it made sense to put a majority of their budget into an ad format that worked for them, but our study’s findings are a major differentiator because it indicates that a mix works better at driving awareness, purchase intent and brand favorability. Creating this sort of variation in ad experiences doesn’t necessarily require creating a whole host of new assets. In our study, the same exact ad led to better results when presented differently.”

Read the article on Adweek
Read the Press Release
Download the full report

NEW STUDY BY TWITTER, MAGNA & IPG MEDIA LAB FINDS DIVERSIFYING ACROSS AD FORMATS MAKES MEDIA DOLLARS GO FURTHER

Study Reveals Delivering a Mix in Ad Formats Creates Better Storytelling, Drives Intent to Take Action & Leads to Higher ROI

NEW YORK – July 9, 2020 – Now more than ever advertising budgets are fixed, leaving the bulk of advertisers questioning whether to spend more on a single ad format or spread budget across multiple formats. In a new study by Twitter, MAGNA and IPG Media Lab, “Mixing It Up: Diversifying Ad Formats to Achieve More,” results demonstrate that diversifying ad formats in digital advertising can help marketers better convey their story and create bigger impact on awareness, brand favorability, as well as research and purchase intent. In addition, being thoughtful about the order in which ad formats are delivered can further boost performance.

 

The main objective of the study was to find out if ad format synergy is real, and if so, explore how advertisers should leverage it to make budgets go further. Research was conducted in two parts: via eye-tracking to test eyes on screen and ad effectiveness to test impact on branding metrics across different ad formats and ad mixes. The ad effectiveness portion included around 4,000 Twitter users for participation on mobile devices across three ad types including Pre-roll (which is known as Amplify at Twitter), traditional Promoted Video, and First View. The test was conducted across six industry verticals and 136 different ad scenarios.

 

Additional key findings of the study include:

 

  • A Mix for Better Storytelling: Seeing an ad in a variety of visually different contexts makes the ad stand out more and ultimately tell a more compelling story (holding frequency constant). Using multiple formats leads to 6X the impact on research intent and 2X the impact on purchase intent. In addition, the study found that maximizing the variation in look and feel across ad exposures by breaking up more similar formats leads to lifts in positive brand perceptions like favorability, as well as purchase intent.

 

  • First Impressions Count: Casting the widest “attention net” with the first exposure maximizes overall campaign impact. Advertisers should aim for the first exposure to be the most attention grabbing, which in this case was the First View ad format that appears at the top of consumers’ content feed. The tactic of using First View as the first exposure is 27% more cost efficient at impacting purchase intent than using another format first.

 

  • Leverage Unique Strengths: While a mix of ad formats works harder in part because a mix simply offers variation for the consumer, the unique role of each ad format also plays a part. First View generates mass attention, while Pre-roll and Promoted Video work together to drive new consumers and past purchasers through the purchase journey.

 

  • Pre-roll drives awareness to a broad group of consumers (+8% new product awareness) and leads consumers to learn more (+8% research intent).
  • Promoted Video resonates especially strongly among consumers with a previous relationship with the brand (past purchasers of the brand are +14% more likely to complete Promoted Video), boosts awareness of cultural connections (+18% cultural associations) and fosters positive brand perceptions (+9% Brand is Good Quality).

 

Stephanie Prager, Twitter’s Head of Global Business Partners, said, “When you’re building a campaign, you’re trying to tell the best, most impactful and most accessible story possible. Our research validates that at its best, storytelling isn’t just about the message; it’s also about the method. We hope this encourages advertisers to continue exploring and experimenting with the different surfaces and formats for their messages that live within digital platforms like Twitter.”

 

“For a long time, many brands thought it made sense to put a majority of their budget into an ad format that worked for them, but our study’s findings are a major differentiator because it indicates that a mix works better at driving awareness, purchase intent and brand favorability,” said Kara Manatt, SVP, Intelligence Solutions at MAGNA. “Creating this sort of variation in ad experiences doesn’t necessarily require creating a whole host of new assets. In our study, the same exact ad led to better results when presented differently.”

 

The full study can be found  here.

 

About Twitter

Twitter, Inc. (NYSE: TWTR) is what’s happening in the world and what people are talking about right now. On Twitter, live comes to life as conversations unfold, showing you all sides of the story. From breaking news and entertainment to sports, politics and everyday interests, when things happen in the world, they happen first on Twitter. Twitter is available in more than 40 languages around the world. The service can be accessed at twitter.com, on a variety of mobile devices and via SMS. For more information, visit about.twitter.com or follow @twitter. For information on how to download the Twitter and Periscope apps, visit twitter.com/download and periscope.tv.

 

About MAGNA

MAGNA is the centralized IPG Mediabrands resource that provides strategic investment and media intelligence for agency teams and clients. We utilize our insights, forecasts and strategic relationships to provide clients with a competitive marketplace advantage.

 

MAGNA harnesses the aggregate power of all IPG media investments to develop go-to-market strategies, designing unique partnerships to drive maximum value for our clients. MAGNA has set the industry standard for more than 60 years by predicting the future of media value. We publish more than 40 annual reports on audience trends, media spend and market demand as well as ad effectiveness.

 

MAGNA infuses the organization with knowledge that empowers better decision-making. We are a team of experts across five key competencies who support IPG cross-functional teams through: Partnership, Enablement, Accountability and Connectivity. Follow us on Twitter @MAGNAGLOBAL.

 

 

About IPG Media Lab

Part of the Interpublic network, the IPG Media Lab identifies and researches innovations and trends that will change the media landscape and how brands engage with their audiences. Since 2006, the Lab has worked with our clients and with industry partners who can help them best adapt to disruptive change. Its expertise, resources and consulting services also help to inform the learnings, strategies and business outcomes of all Interpublic agencies. For more information, please visit www.ipglab.com or follow @ipglab.

 

# # #

 

Media Contact:

Zinnia Gill

IPG Mediabrands

Director, Global Corporate Communications

(646) 965-4271

zinnia.gill@mbww.com

 

The Power of Connecting with What’s Happening

By Taylor Ward, Research Manager, Twitter and Kara Manatt, SVP Group Director, Magna Intelligence.

 

Download the full report

 

For as long as mass media has existed, brands have had a seat at the table during major cultural moments. As viewers, we’ve come to expect to see our favourite sporting events and concerts brought to us by brand sponsors. It is common practice for the ads we watch to feature celebrities and be in touch with the latest popular trends. More recently, we’ve even begun to see brands support and help drive social issues that are important to their audience. In 2019 Twitter and MAGNA interviewed 505 people in the UK for their research on “The Power of Connecting with What’s Happening,” where they looked at how brand involvement in culture impacts consumer perceptions and what it means for a brand to be culturally relevant.

Forty-one percent of those surveyed felt it is important for brands to be involved in social issues and movements, while 36% consider it important for brands to be involved in live events (such as the BRIT awards) and trends like organic and clean products. Young adults (A18-35) feel even more strongly, not only about culture in general, but also the importance of brand involvement in it. And all signs point to that sentiment growing over time.

For brands, aligning with and reflecting culture is key to staying relevant and top-of-mind; and for those that do it best, integrating with culture is truly part of their identity. However, what impact do these efforts have on their business objectives? As it turns out, a sizeable one. Almost one-fifth (18%) of a consumer’s purchase decision is based on a brand’s cultural involvement. This is good news for marketers who have little control in the short term over the other factors that drive purchase decisions—price and quality (55%) and brand perceptions (27%)—but who have direct control over how their messaging reflects culture.

Brands who have established themselves as more culturally relevant in the eyes of consumers also benefit in other ways. At a high level, consumers are simply more likely to identify with them; 2.5 times more likely, to be exact. It establishes a personal connection, which is no small feat for an advertiser. Culturally relevant brands also have the added perks of being seen as “authentic,” “innovative,” “inspiring,” and “thoughtful”–all attributes that can be difficult to convey in an ad. Instead, these attributes are implicitly communicated through actions and campaigns aimed at making those connections (e.g. giving back to local communities, sponsoring the Latin Grammy Awards, etc.).

So what are the best ways for brands to be involved in culture? In our current uncertain times, some brands have taken quick action to adjust and respond. Take Spotify, for example. While involvement with culture is nothing new for them–they have always supported events that are important to consumers–they’ve recently sought to play a positive role in the current global crisis. This includes conveying messages of support for key workers on the frontlines, and matching donations up to $10 million USD to provide COVID-19 relief for the music industry globally. These efforts align with the actions that consumers consider important—giving to the community (52%) and supporting social issues that are important to everyone (48%).

While “giving back” is at the top of the list for consumers, that’s not the only impactful option available to brands. They can get into consumers’ good graces by being inclusive, transparent, and of course “sponsoring cultural events”. This is good news for all brands. With so many options available, it means they have the ability to get involved in ways that are truly authentic. While the research shows that being a culturally relevant brand pays off in a myriad of ways, it is important to focus on the issues, trends, and events with which they genuinely align.

By asking consumers to rate the cultural relevance of brands across a range of industries, (including those that are often thought of as less “exciting”), we confirmed that they have the ability to stand out as relevant regardless of their category. Even more traditional verticals such as financial services have wide variation in cultural relevance from brand to brand. This demonstrates that every industry has room for competition and growth when it comes to cultural relevance.

While this research demonstrates that playing an active role in culture is critical to brands’ business objectives, COVID-19 has put the spotlight on something more personal; corporations no longer exist simply to drive sales. Now more than ever, it’s important for brands to stay engaged and be there for their customers. Making donations, giving thanks to frontline workers, and being a resource for information and support not only has a positive impact on-brand, but also helps serve a greater purpose.

For more recommendations on how your brand can effectively communicate during this difficult time, see Twitter’s blog post ”Brand Communications in a Time of Crisis.”

 

Unlike TV, Almost All Viewers Are Present for Digital Video Ads

But their attention starts to drop after two seconds

 

person's hands typing on a laptop
Almost 100% of people are present for digital display ads.

 

More people are staying indoors and staring at their screens, but are those people still looking at their screens when an ad shows up?

According to a study from Magna, around 99% of people are present or within a viewable distance of their screen for at least one second when a video ad appears. But viewer presence declines over time, dipping below 94% after six seconds.

Digital advertising is approximately a $150 billion marketplace, so “every percentage point counts,” said Kara Manatt, Magna Global’s svp, group director, intelligence solutions.

As part of a viewability study, Magna examined the digital consumption habits of over 100 U.S. participants to measure whether people were actually in front of their computers and mobile devices. Magna ran a similar study in December that found 29% of TV ads aired to an empty room.

While the vast majority of participants were physically present, there’s still no guarantee they were actually paying attention.

“We were focused on one piece of viewability, which does not equal attention,” said Manatt. “It’s really the ad’s job to have an impact and garner attention.”

Some ad formats have a better chance of garnering attention than others. Pre-roll video ads have a presence of 99.5%, while mid-roll comes in at 97.1%. Manatt said attention-related best practices are especially important for mid-roll ads.

“Otherwise [consumers] are going to run to the restroom or do exactly what they do with TV ads and run an in-the-house errand or do something else during the ad pod,” she said.

Among YouTube, Hulu, Facebook and what Magna categorized as “other websites,” presence dropped the most on Facebook’s video ads by 7% after two seconds.

The study showed that nearly 100% of people are present for mobile display ads.

Read the article on Adweek
Read the press release
Download the full report

 

NEW STUDY BY MAGNA AND IPG MEDIA LAB QUANTIFIES HOW OFTEN NON-FRAUDULENT DIGITAL AD IMPRESSIONS ARE WASTED BECAUSE NO ONE IS PRESENT

Dissecting ‘Opportunity to See’ Reveals That When Digital Ads Appear on Screen, A Person is Present 99.2% of the Time, But That Begins to Drop After 2+ Seconds

 

NEW YORK – May 11, 2020 – Thus far, the advertising industry has primarily focused on only one of the factors that determines “opportunity to see” digital ads – whether the ad actually appears on the screen. What is often not discussed is the other factor that offers a non-fraudulent digital ad an “opportunity to be seen” – a person is present when the ad is on screen. To date, human presence has often been overlooked by the industry because it is difficult to measure, and because ads are served to personal devices like mobile phones. Thus, it is presumed that someone is present when a digital ad is on screen. While it seems logical, no one has actually tested this conjecture until now.

 

This concept of human “presence” is a common concern for TV ads given the fact that people often leave the room during commercial breaks. In fact, MAGNA, IPG Media Lab, and TVision recently quantified how often an ad airs to an empty room, which is 29% of the time. As a follow-up, a new study by MAGNA and IPG Media Lab, “Dissecting ‘Opportunity to See,’” tested the presumption that a person is present when digital ads appear on the screen, in an effort to quantify how often digital ads appear without the person present.

 

Presence is defined as a person in the same visual range (for >=1 sec) of a digital ad that fully appears on the screen (the person may or may not be looking at the screen).  A major finding from the study is that while presence is very high at first (99.2%), it does decline.  For example, 94% of non-skippable video ads reached six or more seconds of human presence.

 

For the study, participants used in-home POV cameras to record their digital viewing experiences across PC and mobile devices in a natural environment over the course of two weeks. In each instance, the camera was mounted to the participant’s head in order to obtain a view of where they are in relation to their digital device, and a screen recorder was turned on their PC and mobile devices to capture what’s on the screen. The study included 102 participants, with 1,004 hours of video recorded and analyzed.

 

“It’s crucial for marketers to accurately understand both of the components that determine whether ads have the opportunity to be seen”, said Kara Manatt, SVP, Group Director, Intelligence Solutions, MAGNA Global. “While the industry has a strong understanding of ‘ads on screen’, we’ve yet to understand whether we should expect a person to always be present. This research finally quantifies this for us and provides invaluable insight into consumer behavior.”

 

Additional key findings include:

  • There was nearly total presence regardless of device and for both digital video (98.4%) and display (100%).
  • All video positions are not created equally; digital presence for pre-roll video sat at 99.5%, compared to mid-roll video at 97.1%.
  • Overall, 97.7% of digital video ads had presence for 2+ seconds.
  • Presence, however, declines over time indicating the continued need for the industry to understand how to best capture and hold consumer attention.

 

The full study can be found  here.  As mentioned earlier, the study was a follow up to research conducted by MAGNA and IPG Media Lab, in partnership with TVision, “Quantifying TV Viewability,” which revealed how often people are in the room when ads air and how this varies by daypart, position in ad pod and ad length.

Download the report

 

About MAGNA

MAGNA is the centralized IPG Mediabrands resource that develops intelligence, investment and innovation strategies for agency teams and clients. We utilize our insights, forecasts and strategic relationships to provide clients with a competitive marketplace advantage.

 

MAGNA harnesses the aggregate power of all IPG media investments to create leverage in the market, negotiate preferred pricing and secure premium inventory to drive maximum value for our clients. The MAGNA Investment and Innovation teams architect go-to-market investment strategies across all channels including linear television, print, digital and programmatic on behalf of IPG clients. The team focuses on the use of emerging media opportunities, as well as data and technology-enabled solutions to drive optimal client performance and business results.

 

MAGNA Intelligence has set the industry standard for more than 60 years by predicting the future of media value. The MAGNA Intelligence team produces more than 40 annual reports on audience trends, media spend and market demand as well as ad effectiveness.

 

About IPG Media Lab

Part of the Interpublic network, the IPG Media Lab identifies and researches innovations and trends that will change the media landscape and how brands engage with their audiences. Since 2006, the Lab has worked with our clients and with industry partners who can help them best adapt to disruptive change. Its expertise, resources and consulting services also help to inform the learnings, strategies and business outcomes of all Interpublic agencies. For more information, please visit www.ipglab.com or follow @ipglab.

 

# # #

 

Media Contact:

Zinnia Gill

IPG Mediabrands

Director, Global Corporate Communications

(646) 965-4271

zinnia.gill@mbww.com