CULTURE-FOCUSED ADS INCREASE BRAND RELEVANCY AND CONSUMER PURCHASE INTENT IN CANADA, ACCORDING TO NEW STUDY BY TWITTER, MAGNA, AND IPG MEDIA LAB

Canadian Consumers Say It’s Important for Brand to Take a Stand,

But They Must Be Thoughtful and Authentic in Their Approach

Traditionally, brands sell products through brand-centric messaging. Yet as cultural events gain traction among audiences, there is a unique opportunity for brands to make meaningful connections with consumers through shared perspectives. The question is, do consumers care about a brand’s cultural connections when making a purchase?

A Canadian version of the global media trial released by Twitter, MAGNA, and IPG Media Lab looks at the Canadian consumer’s view of brand involvement in culture. Inspired by the rise of brands weighing in on real world moments their audiences are talking about, the study asks two important questions: How should we define culture from a consumer’s point of view? How do consumers think about culture in relation to the brand they interact with?

Here’s a breakdown of their top findings:

  • CULTURAL RELEVANCE HOLDS PURCHASE POWER
    When it comes to making purchase decisions, being involved in culture is nearly as important as having a positive brand perception (24% vs 30%). Of the different types of cultural involvement, brands that promote social issues have the most impact on consumer spend.
  • BRANDS SHOULD STAND UP FOR SOCIAL ISSUES
    51% of consumers feel it’s important for brands to be involved in social movements, such as gender equality and fair trade.
  • POP CULTURE COUNTS
    37% of consumers appreciate when a brand associates itself with pop culture events/moments, everything from the Oscars and the Super Bowl right down to #tacotuesday.
  • CULTURE IS KEY, BUT GIVING BACK IS KING
    Consumers feel brands should be philanthropic, with 63% agreeing they should give back to the community and 60% voicing they should support social issues that benefit everyone.
  • INCLUSION IS IMPERATIVE
    61% of consumers said that brands seeking to be more culturally relevant should be inclusive of all types of people.
  • CELEBS HOLD LITTLE SWAY
    Turns out that celebs are not the biggest culture drivers. Celebrity endorsements were the least popular way consumers believe brands can become more culturally relevant.

For this study, consumers were asked about their opinions regarding brand involvement with culture. The second part of the test served both traditional, product-ads and culture-focused ads to participants on their Twitter feed. A post-exposure survey was then conducted to measure a number of key brand metrics – including ad recall, brand perceptions, etc. – and to elicit qualitative feedback.

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